Amitabh Chandra, PhD

One of the great thought leaders in healthcare today because 1) he’s super smart and 2) he’s not beholden to any stakeholder.

– Marty Makary, MD

About Keynote Speaker Amitabh Chandra, PhD

Amitabh Chandra, PhD is the Henry and Allison McCance Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and the Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy and Director of Health Policy Research at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Amitabh is a member of the Congressional Budget Office’s (CBO) Panel of Health Advisors, and is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). His research focuses on innovation and pricing in the biopharmaceutical industry, value in health care, medical malpractice, and racial disparities in healthcare. Amityabh’s research has been supported by the National Institute of Aging, the National Institute of Child Health and Development, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and has been published in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and Health Affairs and is the Chair Editor of the Review of Economics and Statistics.

Speech Topics

The Healthcare Trilemma: Access, Costs and Innovation

Professor Chandra invites attendees to consider the three major challenges that confront U.S. healthcare: access, quality, and medical innovation. He describes how these challenges are likely to mutate in the future, and the roles that the principal stakeholders—doctors, insurers, hospitals, innovators, and government—may assume, given their relative capacity to adapt to these challenges. Of these stakeholders, physicians are potentially the central players, but a raft of issues, ranging from medical liability to reimbursement, have a major impact on physicians’ ability to lead the transformation. He will conclude with a thoughtful discussion of the potential incentives that can help in making physicians the leaders in the transformation of American healthcare.

Innovation and Access Dilemma: Pharmaceutical Pricing in an Age of Curative Medicines

This conversation considers the unique challenges and opportunities created by precision-medicines and strategies that can help increase access to them. Competition between precision-medicines is likely to be smaller than for other treatments because of the precision nature of their treatments. Small markets mean that new entrants will be limited, which means that there is less brand-to-brand competition early in a product’s life cycle. Competition from a generic equivalent or follow-on biologic drug is also delayed because of small market size.  One proposed solution is the creation of new financial instruments that would function like mortgages to spread the costs of high-value, high-price treatments over time, thus decreasing the upfront financial burden for patients and payers alike. Others include publicly financed “high-risk pools” that may help cover high-cost therapies, “Netflix”-like subscription models for drugs where access challenges create public-health hazards, policies that would help spread risk by decoupling insurance from employment by encouraging employers to purchase insurance on exchanges. These approaches are contrasted to those where government negotiates the prices of novel therapeutics.

Speakers Videos

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KEYWORDS: Business of Healthcare, Change, Competition, Future, Governance, Healthcare Reform, Innovation, Policy, Population Health, Reform, Strategy, Technology, Trends, Vision, Workforce Issues