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Keynote Speakers, Medical Speakers & Experts on Change
Featured is a partial list of our speakers who address the topics of Caregiving. We invite you to contact us 503-345-9164 so that we may offer our Top Choices - based on your meetings goals, audience and budget.
Meryl Comer
Meryl Comer
Meryl Comer is an Emmy award-winning reporter, producer, moderator & talk show host with more than 30 years of broadcast journalism experience. She is President of the Geoffrey Beene Foundation Alzheimer's Initiative & New York Times bestselling author of Slow Dancing with a Stranger. She offers insight and guidance for navigating Alzheimer's challenges and an urgent call to action for intensive research and a warning that we must prepare for the future, instead of being controlled by a disease and a healthcare system unable to fight it.

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Carl Hammerschlag, MD
Carl Hammerschlag, MD
Carl A. Hammerschlag, M.D., a psychiatrist, author, and professional speaker says that "When we heal in community it actually makes a healthy outcome more likely, because everyone has a stake in the outcome." He is an authority in health and wellness, healing, leadership, authenticity and surviving in rapidly changing times. A master storyteller, he uses his stories to illustrate that the future of healthcare rests in the ability of community to provide for prevention of disease. For the last 25 years he has been a humanitarian clown, joining Patch Adams MD the world’s most recognized humanitarian clown/doctor, spreading clown joy and healing in disaster areas, refugee camps, and institutions all over the world.

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Jane Heller
Jane Heller
New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Jane Heller has sold many of her 13 romantic comedies to Hollywood, but in her personal life she was thrust into the world of caregiving after she married a man with an illness, just like her mother did years before. Her critically acclaimed book, "You'd Better Not Die or I'll Kill You: A Caregiver's Survival Guide to Keeping You in Good Health and Good Spirits," chronicles her candid, often hilarious, always inspiring journey from novice caregiver to 20-year veteran. She speaks passionately about the caregiving experience, whether one is caring for a child with autism or a parent with Alzheimer's, particularly now that her 98-year-old mother suffers from dementia. She delivers, as Library Journal put it, "a valuable, virtual support group."

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Tembi Locke
Tembi Locke
Actor, Mom, Writer, Artist, Chef's wife and now a young widow, Tembi Locke shares her passionate love affair with her husband and the heart-rending diagnosis that taught her how grief can "transform" and resilience "emerge!" Her creation, "The Kitchen Widow" is a modern take on the age-old kitchen table conversation - an inspirational online platform dedicated to raising awareness about how we can support each other through times of illness and grief. Tembi reminds us to reclaim the lost art of comforting the soul. Using the tools Tembi learned at the side of a chef, she chops, tastes and transforms the raw ingredients of loss and gratitude into something generous and sustaining.

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Stephen Kiernan
Stephen Kiernan
A prolific writer and award-winning journalist, Stephen Kiernan's true-life stories focus on the disparities in healthcare, and a sense of disconnection that people feel distress, anxiety, and prolonged belief that the country is headed in the wrong direction. Brought to the stage in word and video, his program is inspirational, educational and defines a path we can follow in sustaining the strength of our country. Stephen features individuals whose work made economic, as well as humanitarian, sense. Also their projects could be replicated in other communities. An uplifting message delivering positive results!

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Elaine Sanchez
Elaine Sanchez
Author of, Letters From Madelyn - Chronicles of a Caregiver, Elaine Sanchez has been described as part Erma Bombeck and part Garrison Keillor! Caregiving audiences appreciate the manner in which she deals with the grim reality of aging and illness, and proves that grace, humor and faith can transcend tragedy. Elaine's tender, gritty and uproariously funny "one woman show," has the audience laughing through their tears! Her two workshops: Boomer Bootcamp-designed to help families gather the information they need to make major care-giving decisions and Caregivers Survival Training-recognizing and coping with the stages of caregiving receive RAVE reviews.

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Alex Sheen
Alex Sheen
Alex Sheen is the Founder of "because I said I would." Through his philanthropic work, his personal commitments and the stories of his supporters, Alex speaks to audiences around the world about the importance of keeping a promise. His work has been featured on ABC World News with Diane Sawyer, Good Morning America, the TODAY show, Steve Harvey, CNN, The Los Angeles Times, NPR and many other programs. Alex has spoken at over 110 events in 2014 and is a three-time TEDx closing speaker. He has spoken to audiences ranging from middle schools to the world’s largest consulting firm.

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  • The 2016 election is over, and a top priority for the new administration and Congress is healthcare. The candidates discussed little substance about healthcare during the campaigns, despite the fact it is approaching 20% of our economy and touches every American. You could say the problems in healthcare have been caused by action by one party and inaction by another party. You could say Republicans want this and Democrats want that, but I don’t think labeling should be the focus. The problem is Congress (both parties) are tied to special interest groups. Insurers, medical device manufacturers, pharmaceutical companies, and the plaintiff’s bar, along with Congress created our unaffordable healthcare system.
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  • Telehealth is here to stay, but it will go through an evolution like all new technology shifts. A new study evaluated performance of teledermatology. The results were mixed. There were incorrect diagnoses and missed diagnoses. Treatment recommendations were not always consistent with guidelines. Prescriptions frequently lacked disclosure about possible adverse effects.  The study was limited because there are not yet large numbers of cases to evaluate. A significant limitation to the study was the authors were unable to assess whether clinicians seeing these patients in traditional in-person encounters would have performed any better.

    On balance, telehealth is a good thing. It has the potential to expand access to more patients, and the medical literature is filled with examples of telehealth systems providing quality care.


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  • Squeezing in a little exercise improves concentration and actually makes your meeting more productive. Waking up the mind and body creates a better atmosphere for listening to the innovative thoughts and ideas being delivered and better prepares us for putting those ideas into action when we return to the workplace.

    Invite a person from your Leadership Team to deliver a “3-5 minute” exercise break. Exercise helps increase energy levels, as well as concentration levels.  Break up the presentations where sitting for long periods can put the mind, not to mention other parts of the body, to sleep.  The break also creates a different type of exposure for your attendees to interact with leadership! 
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  • Re-Posted from John Patrick’s Blog on Accelerating Cancer Treatment…I remember being at a technology conference in 1999 when teenagers Sean Parker and Shawn Fanning demonstrated a digital music service called Napster. It was the beginning of a revolution, and it made a lot of sense to me. The rock group Metallica sued Napster in 2000 and the momentum of music sharing slowed – temporarily. I never saw the problem as theft. I saw it as an industry unwilling to give up the status quo and give consumers a way to purchase music. It took Steve Jobs, the iPod, and iTunes to ignite major growth in digital music.
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  • Dr. John Patrick has the following to say to our next president:

    The 2016 political scene is unfolding. In less than a year, American citizens will decide who our next President will be. So far, in the debates, town halls, and speeches, little substance has been discussed about healthcare, despite the fact it is approaching 20% of our economy and touches every American. You could say the problems in healthcare have been caused by action by one party and inaction by another party. You could say Republicans want this and Democrats want that, but I don’t think labeling should be the focus.
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  • The latest in healthcare technology is from John Patrick’s blog:

    When doctors or nurses measure our blood pressure, they normally place a cuff around our arm and inflate it. The measurement is for a point in time and sometimes representative. Scientists at Australia’s Monash University are developing a new approach. Their cuffless “blood pressure estimation system” can be worn for hours at a time and wirelessly transmit real-time readings.

    The new approach uses radar technology and is comfortable because no pressure is applied to a patient’s body. Lead scientist Mehmet Yuce explains:

    The system incorporates a few small sensors that are worn against the skin at arterial sites, beneath the clothing.
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  • Recently I took a cab from the Dallas airport to a downtown hotel. During the ride I inquired of my driver what he thought of Uber. That was a mistake. I got a detailed and thorough analysis of everything he thought was wrong with the Uber concept and why it could not possibly last. His argument included that the drivers were not licensed, they did not have to pass any sort of test about the geography of the city, and that they did not carry adequate insurance. This contrasted with everything I’d heard from many friends that Uber is the best thing that has happened to intra-city travel.
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  • In the late 1800’s France poured money, men and material into building the Panama Canal. They were spectacularly unsuccessful. Years later the concept of a canal intrigued President Theodore Roosevelt. The prevailing sentiment at the time was that the canal should go to Nicaragua presumably because clearly anything connected with the French had to be slipshod.

    It was only after some thoughtful discussion and Roosevelt’s leadership that the decision was made for the United States to build the canal through Panama along the same route previously attempted by the French.

    In today’s environment anyone or anything associated with the Affordable Care Act is also immediately dismissed as irrelevant and moot by the political right.
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