SPEAKERS IN THE SPOTLIGHT


2016 CNN Top 10 Heroes - Brad Ludden
Speakers On Healthcare's own Brad Ludden was selected as one of ten CNN Heroes for 2016. He founded First Descents to give young cancer patients some "victory over their cancer"and help them face down their fears and realize they are not alone. A first descent is when someone successfully paddles a section of river that no one has ever paddled before.
Read more about Brad Ludden

The Art of the Heal - What does Trump's win mean for Healthcare In America?
76% of consumers want President-elect Trump to make healthcare a priority. Like a chief executive hired to turn a failing company into a profitable one, president-elect Trump has said he will take an unflinching corporate approach to overhauling the US healthcare system. For an industry that prefers stability to surprises-and one that has worked to adapt to the Affordable Care Act-Trump's "repeal and replace" agenda coupled with his proposed market based approach may create new uncertainty and opportunity. When planning your meetings, consider this timely presentation, Dr Pillay reviews Trumps' health policy platform and examines the potential implications and impact of a burgeoning New Health Economy.
Read more about Rubin Pillay, MD, PhD

Institute for Human Caring, advisory council member Tembi Locke
Tembi Locke was a kitchen widow before she became "The Kitchen Widow." Used to describe the wives of chefs, the term took on a whole new meaning when her husband and partner of 20 years, a Sicilian chef, died of cancer. "When he died," she says, "I did what I'd always done: I went back to the table." Pictured with Institute for Human Caring, executive director Dr. Ira Byock and co-advisory council member BJ Miller at the "Before I Die" Photography exhibit at the Museum of Tolerance. They are leading a transformation of health services to emphasize whole person care, encouraging patients to talk with their doctors and families about what kind of care they want through the end of life.
Read more about Tembi Locke

Dr. Maroon's New Book Release
SQUARE ONE - A Simple Guide To A Balanced Life will be released November 2016. It has already been met with rave reviews: "Through his unflinching candor and relentless research, Joe offers readers a gift we all need and crave, even when we don't quite know how to define it- a balanced life. This book has already changed me." Dr. Sanjay Gupta
"The way Joe Maroon takes care of himself and his patients is a testament to passion and great science. I often tell him that he is my hero and I want to be like him as I age. This new book is an important roadmap for anyone who wants to get and stay healthy." Dr. Daniel Amen
Read more about Joseph Maroon, MD

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SPEAKERS ON HEALTHCARE

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SPEAKERS BY TOPIC

Speakers On Healthcare prides itself on representing speakers and celebrities who are experts in the latest healthcare issues. We invite you to preview our motivational and inspirational keynote speakers, medical speakers, authors, and celebrities by selecting the topic link below that best matches your area of interest. A partial list of our speakers is featured on our website. For a complete list or customized selection of our top speakers and celebrities, based on your topic and budget, please call us: 503-345-9164:

  • The 2016 election is over, and a top priority for the new administration and Congress is healthcare. The candidates discussed little substance about healthcare during the campaigns, despite the fact it is approaching 20% of our economy and touches every American. You could say the problems in healthcare have been caused by action by one party and inaction by another party. You could say Republicans want this and Democrats want that, but I don’t think labeling should be the focus. The problem is Congress (both parties) are tied to special interest groups. Insurers, medical device manufacturers, pharmaceutical companies, and the plaintiff’s bar, along with Congress created our unaffordable healthcare system.
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  • Squeezing in a little exercise improves concentration and actually makes your meeting more productive. Waking up the mind and body creates a better atmosphere for listening to the innovative thoughts and ideas being delivered and better prepares us for putting those ideas into action when we return to the workplace.

    Invite a person from your Leadership Team to deliver a “3-5 minute” exercise break. Exercise helps increase energy levels, as well as concentration levels.  Break up the presentations where sitting for long periods can put the mind, not to mention other parts of the body, to sleep.  The break also creates a different type of exposure for your attendees to interact with leadership! 
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  • Re-Posted from John Patrick’s Blog on Accelerating Cancer Treatment…I remember being at a technology conference in 1999 when teenagers Sean Parker and Shawn Fanning demonstrated a digital music service called Napster. It was the beginning of a revolution, and it made a lot of sense to me. The rock group Metallica sued Napster in 2000 and the momentum of music sharing slowed – temporarily. I never saw the problem as theft. I saw it as an industry unwilling to give up the status quo and give consumers a way to purchase music. It took Steve Jobs, the iPod, and iTunes to ignite major growth in digital music.
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  • Dr. John Patrick has the following to say to our next president:

    The 2016 political scene is unfolding. In less than a year, American citizens will decide who our next President will be. So far, in the debates, town halls, and speeches, little substance has been discussed about healthcare, despite the fact it is approaching 20% of our economy and touches every American. You could say the problems in healthcare have been caused by action by one party and inaction by another party. You could say Republicans want this and Democrats want that, but I don’t think labeling should be the focus.
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  • The latest in healthcare technology is from John Patrick’s blog:

    When doctors or nurses measure our blood pressure, they normally place a cuff around our arm and inflate it. The measurement is for a point in time and sometimes representative. Scientists at Australia’s Monash University are developing a new approach. Their cuffless “blood pressure estimation system” can be worn for hours at a time and wirelessly transmit real-time readings.

    The new approach uses radar technology and is comfortable because no pressure is applied to a patient’s body. Lead scientist Mehmet Yuce explains:

    The system incorporates a few small sensors that are worn against the skin at arterial sites, beneath the clothing.
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  • Recently I took a cab from the Dallas airport to a downtown hotel. During the ride I inquired of my driver what he thought of Uber. That was a mistake. I got a detailed and thorough analysis of everything he thought was wrong with the Uber concept and why it could not possibly last. His argument included that the drivers were not licensed, they did not have to pass any sort of test about the geography of the city, and that they did not carry adequate insurance. This contrasted with everything I’d heard from many friends that Uber is the best thing that has happened to intra-city travel.
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  • In the late 1800’s France poured money, men and material into building the Panama Canal. They were spectacularly unsuccessful. Years later the concept of a canal intrigued President Theodore Roosevelt. The prevailing sentiment at the time was that the canal should go to Nicaragua presumably because clearly anything connected with the French had to be slipshod.

    It was only after some thoughtful discussion and Roosevelt’s leadership that the decision was made for the United States to build the canal through Panama along the same route previously attempted by the French.

    In today’s environment anyone or anything associated with the Affordable Care Act is also immediately dismissed as irrelevant and moot by the political right.
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  • In a recent article, Healthcare Selfies: Consumers Go Mobile for Better Health, Dr. John Patrick features mobile devices for consumers to monitor their health. One such device is AliveCor. It has a heart monitor that attaches to the back of an iPhone and creates a 30-second EKG. A team of engineers at Cornell University has developed a smartphone camera attachment that takes a photo of a single drop of blood that a consumer has placed on a strip, and in a matter of seconds a colorimetric analysis displays cholesterol level. Read the article for additional devices. The pace of mHealth adoption will accelerate; self-monitoring and self-diagnosis are here to stay.
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  • In a recent interview by Bottom Line/Health, our own Dr. Cynthia Green was asked to suggest her best brain workouts. It’s not what most of us think. Crossword puzzles, online classes and other such activities are not necessarily the best for improving memory and preserving overall cognitive function. The latest research reveals that it takes more than quiet puzzle-solving and streaming lectures.

    In fact, some activities that we once thought were time wasters may actually help build intellectual capacity and other cognitive functions.  And, the most important steps to keep your brain performing at optimal levels are lifestyle choices.  Brain workouts that include getting aerobic exercise (at least 150 minutes per week), maintaining a healthy body weight, not smoking and eating a diet that emphasizes fruits and vegetables (low in refined sugar and white flour)

    However, research now tells us that there is more to a healthy brain workout. 
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  • Did you wonder how the Paris attacks could actually create a stronger “World Kindness Day?” True human kindness was shown, at its best, in the days following the attack as witnessed by many of us in the numerous media stories. Tweets, during the attacks, showed how ‘kindness spreads faster than hate.’ Tributes were laid to victims of the Paris attacks at the foot of the Monument a La Republique, in many cases by strangers for strangers.

    Dr. Stephen Post, author of Why Good Things Happen to Good People: How to Live a Longer, Happier, Healthier Life by the Simple Act of Giving, discusses kindness in his lectures across the globe.
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